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Question: divide video subsources over many screens

Discussion in 'Technical Support' started by Floriaan, May 16, 2020.

  1. Floriaan

    Floriaan Well-Known Member

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    Is there a way to divide many subsources of a video over as many separate screens? Right now I do it one by one and that’s kind of tedious with 50 screens...
     
  2. Dany

    Dany Administrator
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    Definitely! I've been meaning to make a video about this for a long time, and your question motivated me to finally do it so here you are.. :rolleyes:



    Hth,

    D.
     
    Xavier78, Floriaan and Jason Gardash like this.
  3. Floriaan

    Floriaan Well-Known Member

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    Thanks a lot. In my situation it didn’t quite work. I have a 360° screen set-up, existing of 154 columns of led tiles. If I build this as it will be in reality, each column consist of 6 to 10 screens, resulting in a subsource count that exceeds the maximum of 1500.
    If I make the column into one long screen select them all and use the quick image/video tool, not all columns are populated. Only about half of them and not all in the right order it seems.
     
  4. Dany

    Dany Administrator
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    No worries, Floriaan. I understand. Your setup is probably not unique, but at the same time I don't believe that developing a tool that can create such a setup "in one go" would be worthwhile. (It can be done, but its use would be rather limited.)

    The first part of the follwing tip might help you here: https://cast-soft.com/wysiwyg/using-the-led-wizard-and-splitting-video-part-2/. It describes how to create a "curved LED wall". I wrote this one a long time ago, before we had the Array functionality I showed in the video, but here's what I'm thinking:

    - create all the panels you need and assign subsources to them as per the video; you will of course end up with a flat LED wall

    - assuming your setup includes vertically-stacked panels, Group each "column" of panels to make them easier to select, etc.

    - nearby, working in Plan View, draw a Circle that matches the diameter of your 360° setup

    - Break the Circle into Lines; the number of Lines should match the number of panels that make up the circumference of the 360° setup; ensure that the Lines' length matches the width of the LED panels you created (the math should work out by itself though)

    - select the first "column"/stack of panels, and Move it from its bottom left corner to the start of the "first" Line

    - rotate the stack of panels as needed

    - repeat the last two steps for the rest of the stacks


    Alternately, you could:

    1. Create the Subsources you need using the Create Multiple option in the Video Manager.

    2. Create one LED panel on a temporary Layer.

    3. Select the panel and use Polar Array to create a "circle of panels" -- this will be the "bottom row" of the stack of panels.

    4. Use the Quick Image/Video tool to assign the bottom row of Subsources to the panels laid out in the circle.

    5. Make a copy of the first panel you created and stack the copy on top of the first panel.

    6. Select the circle of panels (not the copy you made in step 5!) and change their Layer to a Layer that's hidden (or at least undeditable, but hidden is better).

    7. Repeat steps 3 through 6 to create additional, stacks circles of panels.

    8. When done, if the Layer from step 6 was hidden, unhide it to reveal your 360° setup.


    Both methods should yield the same final result, and I think they'll each require about the same amount of time.. the alternate may involve a bit more clicking due to step 4.


    Hth,

    D.
     

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